Associate of Science in Criminal Justice
associate of science in criminal justice
Description

The Associate of Science in Criminal Justice degree program prepares entry-level professionals from diverse backgrounds in the theoretical foundations, knowledge, skills, and practices of criminal justice operations. This program of study enables students to develop rational decisions and informed responses to the daily challenges one faces in law enforcement, corrections, and court operations. Additionally, this study provides students with a working comprehension of constitutional and criminal law in contrast to judicial process.

Students completing this program are prepared for entry-level positions in local, state, and federal criminal justice programs, including law enforcement, corrections, probation and parole, court operations, and related fields in security. This program promotes a commitment to continued scholarship and service among graduates as future members of the criminal justice profession in a manner that remains conducive to enhancing professionalism in a diverse community.

THE AMERICAN UNIVERSITY’s online A.S. in criminal justice degree program prepares graduates for entry-level positions in local, state and federal criminal justice programs. This study provides students with a working comprehension of constitutional and criminal law in contract to the judicial process, providing graduates with the theoretical foundations, knowledge, skills and practices of criminal justice operations.  

Last Updated on

December 27th, 2023 08:41 am

Upon completion of the program, students should be able to do the following:

  • Evaluate the three main components of a criminal justice system.
  • Examine the psychology of crime including the development of the criminal lifestyle.
  • Evaluate the roles and challenges of juvenile justice agencies.
  • Explain the interdependence between applicable judicial processes.

 

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Curriculum

The Associate of Science in Criminal Justice degree program prepares entry-level professionals from diverse backgrounds in the theoretical foundations, knowledge, skills, and practices of criminal justice operations. This program of study enables students to develop rational decisions and informed responses to the daily challenges one faces in law enforcement, corrections, and court operations. Additionally, this program of study provides students with a working comprehension of constitutional and criminal law in contrast to judicial process. Students completing this program are prepared for entry-level positions in local, state, and federal criminal justice programs, including law enforcement, corrections, probation and parole, court operations, and related fields in security. This program promotes a commitment to continued scholarship and service among graduates as future members of the criminal justice profession in a manner that remains conducive to enhancing professionalism in a diverse community.

Major Requirements| Total Required Semester Hours: 18

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GENERAL EDUCATION | Total Required Semester Hours: 21

English Composition
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Description

Introduces the basic concepts and requirements of college-level writing. This course provides students with the opportunity to implement effective communication skills via the written word.

Outcomes

  1. Demonstrate proper use of Standard Written English and the conventions of APA documentation style.
  2. Employ the concepts of audience and perspective when approaching others in the writing situation.
  3. Construct different genres of writing.
  4. Effectively incorporate relevant academic sources containing both qualitative and quantitative data.
  5. Demonstrate critical reading skills that translate to improvement in writing practices, such as the crafting of effective sentences and paragraphs.
  6. Utilize pre-writing and planning strategies for the writing process.
  7. Assert argumentative thesis statements that are supported by structured essays that have an introduction, body, and conclusion.

Prerequisites

None

Textbook(s)

Integrated Learning Resource

Publisher: (No information available)
Author: (No information available)
ISBN: (No information available)
Price: (No information available)

* Disclaimer: Textbooks listed are based on the last open revision of the course. Prior revisions and future revisions may use different textbooks. To verify textbook information, view the course syllabus or contact the AU Bookstore at [email protected]

 

 
Humanities and Fine Arts
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Mathematics
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Natural Science
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BIO 1100 – Non-Majors Biology

Description

Explores the principles of biology, including the scientific method, cell theory, cellular process, theories of heredity, evolutionary theory, ecology, human physiology, and a survey of the diversity of organisms.

Outcomes

 

  1. Define the basic concepts of biological sciences.

  2. Apply the scientific method.

  3. Explain nutrition in terms of micronutrients and macronutrients.

  4. Explain Mendel’s approach to studying genetics.

  5. Interpret Darwin’s theory of evolution to include natural selection and common descent.

  6. Describe human anatomical systems to include their disease states.

  7. Discuss relationships between living organisms and nonliving factors in ecosystems.

  8. Interpret biological data.

 

PreRequisites

None

Textbook(s)

Biology: Science for life with physiology (Rev: 6th ed.)

Publisher: Pearson (2019)

Author: Belk, C., & Maier, V. B.

ISBN: 9780134555430

Price: $126.16


* Disclaimer: Textbooks listed are based on the last open revision of the course. Prior revisions and future revisions may use different textbooks. To verify textbook information, view the course syllabus or contact the AU Bookstore at [email protected]

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Description

Introduces basic ecological concepts and their relevance to human impacts on natural systems. Students explore ecosystem structure and function, population ecology, and current environmental issues related to sustainability and the use of natural resources.

Outcomes

  1. Explain the importance of ecological concepts in everyday life.

  2. Describe the various factors that affect population growth regulation.

  3. Identify the various ways in which organisms interact with their environment.

  4. Summarize the importance of biodiversity within the environment.

  5. Detail the global exchange of nutrients through biogeochemical cycles.

  6. Describe the various factors that affect the evolution of ecological systems.

  7. Identify ways in which ecology can be used to solve environmental issues.

Prerequisites

None

Textbook(s)

Integrated Learning Resource

Publisher: (No information available)
Author: (No information available)
ISBN: (No information available)
Price: (No information available)

* Disclaimer: Textbooks listed are based on the last open revision of the course. Prior revisions and future revisions may use different textbooks. To verify textbook information, view the course syllabus or contact the AU Bookstore at [email protected]

 

 

Social and Behavioral Science
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Description

Examines government and politics in America by focusing on the origins, entities, processes, and functions of our political system and the influential role of interest groups and the media.

Outcomes

  1. Summarize the origins of American political thought.

  2. Identify the distinctive attributes of the U.S. Constitution and the Bill of Rights.

  3. Describe the three branches of government.

  4. Explain how the U.S. government functions at the federal, state, and local levels.

  5. Identify the role of political parties in the United States political system.

  6. Discuss how policies affect change.

  7. Identify the impact of media on public opinion and politics.

Prerequisites

None

Textbook(s)

Integrated Learning Resource

Publisher: (No information available)
Author: (No information available)
ISBN: (No information available)
Price: (No information available)

* Disclaimer: Textbooks listed are based on the last open revision of the course. Prior revisions and future revisions may use different textbooks. To verify textbook information, view the course syllabus or contact the AU Bookstore at [email protected]

 

 

Electives | Total Required Semester Hours: 21

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Description

A study of trade and international economics. Considers comparative advantage, production factors, and how growth is influenced by trade and various alternative trade theories. Analysis of trade restrictions and the effect of trade on environment and political policies.

Objectives

  1. Distinguish between international and domestic economic issues.
  2. Explain why seven themes recur in international economics and discuss their significance.
  3. Explain how the Ricardian model, the most basic model of international trade, works and how it illustrates the principle of comparative advantage.
  4. Explain how differences in resources can cause international trade.
  5. Discuss why trade often creates losers as well as winners.
  6. Explain the effects of tariffs and subsidies on trade patterns and the welfare of trading nations and on the distribution of income within countries.
  7. Detail the “dumping” arguments used by domestic industries as a basis for protectionism and explain the relationship between dumping and price discrimination.
  8. Discuss the role of external economies and knowledge spillovers in shaping comparative advantage and international trade patterns.
  9. Discuss the causes, as well as the winners and losers, from migration and labor mobility between nations.
  10. Articulate arguments for free trade that go beyond the conventional gains from trade.
  11. Evaluate national welfare arguments against free trade.
  12. Summarize the basic ideas behind “economic dualism” and its relationship to international trade
  13. Discuss the recent economic history of the East Asian countries, such as Taiwan and South Korea, and detail the relationship between their rapid economic growth and participation in international trade.
  14. Summarize the more sophisticated arguments for interventionist trade policy, especially those related to externalities and economies of scale.

PreRequisites

None

Textbook(s)

International economics: Theory and policy (Rev: 9th ed.)

Publisher: Prentice Hall (2013)
Author: Krugman, P., Obstfeld, M., & Melitz, M.
ISBN: 978-0-13-214665-4
Price: $172.58

* Disclaimer: Textbooks listed are based on the last open revision of the course. Prior revisions and future revisions may use different textbooks. To verify textbook information, view the course syllabus or contact the AU Bookstore at [email protected]

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Description

A study of economics in the international context of foreign exchange and currency markets and their impact on international economics. The interrelationship of exchange rates and economics factors are also discussed.

Objectives

  1. Examine the concept of the current account balance.
  2. Employ the current account balance to extend national income accounting to open economies.
  3. Apply national income accounting to the interaction of saving, investment, and net exports.
  4. Evaluate and discuss the national money markets in which interest rates are determined.
  5. Compare how monetary policy and interest rates feed into the foreign exchange market.
  6. Discuss the concept of the real exchange rate.
  7. Analyze the factors that affect real exchange rates and relative currency prices in the long run.
  8. Explain the role of the real exchange rate in determining the aggregate demand for a country’s output.
  9. Demonstrate causes and effects of balance of payments crises.
  10. Evaluate how alternative multilateral systems for pegging exchange rates work.
  11. Explain how the goals of internal and external balance motivate economic policy makers in open economies.
  12. Summarize how the monetary and fiscal policies of a large country such as the United States are transmitted abroad.
  13. Analyze the economic function of international portfolio diversification.
  14. Explain factors leading to the explosive recent growth of international financial markets.
  15. Analyze problems in the regulation and supervision of international banks and nonbank financial institutions.

PreRequisites

  1. MBA 6081

Textbook(s)

International financial management (Rev: 2nd ed.)

Publisher: Prentice Hall (2012)
Author: Bekaert, G., & Hodrick, R.
ISBN: 978-0-13-216276-0
Price: $182.85

* Disclaimer: Textbooks listed are based on the last open revision of the course. Prior revisions and future revisions may use different textbooks. To verify textbook information, view the course syllabus or contact the AU Bookstore at [email protected]

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Description

Presents the foundational theories and methodological tools used in public finance and budgeting. Students apply their knowledge to make use of finance and budgeting methodological tools, such as cost-benefit and cost-effectiveness analysis in the application of finance and budgetary theory to practice, create, and oversee public sector fiscal processes. Students evaluate a budget and identify important budget items that public managers must consider in preparation and presentation of a budget. The usefulness of finance and budgeting theoretical constructs and methodological tools are applied to solve real-world public finance and budgetary case studies.

Objectives

  1. Assess the relationship of historical and contemporary finance-budgeting theory to real-world public administration issues.
  2. Discuss the ethical implications on the budget process at the federal, state, and local levels.
  3. Compare contemporary financial management practices at the federal, state, and local levels.
  4. Identify political factors that influence and determine financial management practice in the public arena.
  5. Evaluate a model budget.
  6. Consider the impact of citizen influence on the budgetary process at various levels of governance.
  7. Describe the impact of budgetary deficiencies on public agencies.
  8. Apply practical methods to reconstructing finance and budgeting techniques.

PreRequisites

  1. PUA 5301

Textbook(s)

Public finance: A contemporary application of theory to policy (Rev: 11th ed.)

Publisher: Cengage Learning (2014)
Author: Hyman, D. N.
ISBN: 978-1-285-17395-5
Price: $266.14

* Disclaimer: Textbooks listed are based on the last open revision of the course. Prior revisions and future revisions may use different textbooks. To verify textbook information, view the course syllabus or contact the AU Bookstore at [email protected]

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Description

Explores the histories, ideas, beliefs, and characteristic practices of the world’s major religions.

Outcomes

  1. Analyze commonalities shared by the world’s major religions.

  2. Discuss factors which have caused potential for conflict within and between religious groups.

  3. Evaluate the impact values have on the goals and functions of a religious body.

  4. Examine how religious beliefs are expressed through engagement in the faith.

  5. Explain differing interpretations of religious tenets.

  6. Utilize research strategies for creating an academic perspective of varied cultures.

Prerequisites

None

Textbook(s)

Understanding the religions of the world: An introduction

Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell (2015)
Author: Deming, W. (Ed.).
ISBN: 9781118767573
Price: $64.93

* Disclaimer: Textbooks listed are based on the last open revision of the course. Prior revisions and future revisions may use different textbooks. To verify textbook information, view the course syllabus or contact the AU Bookstore at [email protected]

 

 

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Description

Introduces components and processes inherent to state and local government in the United States. Acquaints students with the structures and functions of state and local governments as well as the methods and motivations behind political decisions.

Outcomes

  1. Explain the nature of politics.

  2. Analyze the political processes in local government.

  3. Differentiate between powers allocated to the federal government and those allocated to the states.

  4. Distinguish between liberal and conservative ideology in state and local politics.

  5. Explain how policy responsibilities vary among state and local governments.

  6. Summarize the processes of changing state laws or state constitutions.

  7. Explain how citizen attitudes influence policies adopted by governments.

Prerequisites

None

Textbook(s)

Politics in states and communities (Rev: 15th ed.)

Publisher: Pearson (2015)
Author: Dye, T. R., & MacManus, S. A.
ISBN: 978-0-205-99472-4
Price: $104.65

* Disclaimer: Textbooks listed are based on the last open revision of the course. Prior revisions and future revisions may use different textbooks. To verify textbook information, view the course syllabus or contact the AU Bookstore at [email protected]

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Description

Provides an in-depth study of the basic concepts of sociology. Specific attention is given to culture characteristics, societal changes, inequalities in social classes, and how they relate to different groups in society.

Outcomes

  1. Recognize the ideas of sociological theorists in terms of the historical, economic, and social contexts.

  2. Express the relationship between one’s beliefs and one’s group memberships.

  3. Describe the transmission of cultures through socialization.

  4. Interpret patterns of behavior through sociological skills and theory.

  5. Apply micro theories of self, using one’s own digital footprint.

  6. Explain how social structure shapes an individual’s life chances.

Prerequisites

None

Textbook(s)

SOC 2016 (Rev: 4th ed.)

Publisher: McGraw-Hill Education (2016)
Author: Witt, J.
ISBN: 9780078130755
Price: $92.38

* Disclaimer: Textbooks listed are based on the last open revision of the course. Prior revisions and future revisions may use different textbooks. To verify textbook information, view the course syllabus or contact the AU Bookstore at [email protected]